How to Resensitize Yourself Sexually (Let your Penis Feel Again)

The Best Canon DSLR Cameras for 2022

March 4, 2022 Canon, Photography • 6 Comments

Canon might be phasing out DSLRs, but they are not obsolete! Learn about 4 great Canon DSLRs and why you might want to stick with this

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Welcome to my site on tips for dealing with having a small penis.  Please feel free to message me if you wish for me to cover certain issues that you are concerned about.

21. Turn on your self-timer and do a boudoir shoot for yourself

“There’s something special about the act of taking photos,” says Sadie Allison, PhD, founder of GoLove CBD. Taking photos allows you to celebrate your body and simultaneously see yourself as the coveted object of desire you are, she explains.

Put on your favorite sexy silk nightgown, fancy lingerie, or go buff, and use your self-timer to take some hot photos simply for your own use. Knowing they’re just for yourself can also make you less self-conscious about the whole thing. Plus posing and contorting your body for your own gaze is hella hot and empowering.

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30. Browse a NSFW subreddit

Reddit has a bad reputation for being a cesspool of misogynistic garbage, but there are also a lot of nice, sex-friendly, and very sexy subreddits that are perfect fodder for getting horny in a matter of minutes. From sultry fiction to naughty IRL accounts, this is one internet spiral that’ll result in an orgasm as opposed to like, a whole bunch of random shit from Amazon you absolutely don’t need.

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Want to Stop Online Sexual Harassment? Let DoNotPay Keep the Harassers Away

Being a target of online sexual harassment can hav

Being a target of online sexual harassment can have negative repercussions on your emotional, psychological, and physical well-being. To end the cycle of torment, you have to take a stand against the party that bullies you. The painless way to do it is by relying on DoNotPay.

All you need to do is:

  • Access the DoNotPay app from your web browser
  • Select the Relationship Protection option
  • Pick the Explore Relationship Services button
  • Choose Safety and Stalking, then click Let’s Do It
  • Select the Cyberbullying option
  • Provide answers to the chatbot’s questions to the best of your ability

Having collected all the necessary details about the issue and the aggressor, we contact the representatives of the platform where the abuse took place. In your stead, we will:

  1. Report the perpetrator for sexual harassment, so that the representatives can open an investigation of their account
  2. Request that the representatives block the perpetrator’s account and prevent him or her from contacting you in the future

Types of Cyber Sexual Harassment

Online sexual harassment covers a range of behaviors. Depending on how the victim is targeted, it can be roughly categorized as:

  1. Direct online sexual harassment—sending inappropriate sexual content to the victim
  2. Indirect online sexual harassment—sharing or posting sexual content about the victim on or through digital and social platforms

The specific behaviors that the harassers display fall within four major groups, as outlined by project deShame. Check out the overview in the table below..

deShame’s Sexual Behavior Category

Sexual Behavior Examples

Non-consensual sharing of intimate images and videos

  • Taking and sharing sexual videos or photos of the victim without their consent—upskirting or creep shots
  • Taking sexual videos or photos with the victim’s consent, but sharing them without consent—revenge porn
  • Recording non-consensual sex acts (rape) and (or) sharing the content

Sexualized Bullying

  • Body shaming
  • Bullying based on actual or perceived gender or sexual orientation
  • Sharing personal information of an individual without their consent to encourage online sexual harassment—doxxing
  • Using offensive or discriminatory language and name-calling online
  • Impersonating an individual and sharing sexual content online to damage their reputation or sexually harass others
  • ‘Outing’ someone’s gender identity or sexual orientation online without their consent
  • Spreading lies, rumors, or gossip about the victim’s sexual life, either directly naming them or alluding to them

Unwanted sexualization

  • Sexualized comments on the victim’s posts on social media
  • Online advances or requests for sexual favors
  • Online sexual jokes
  • Sending someone (graphic) sexual content without their consent—videos, pictures, emojis, and texts
  • Altering pictures or videos of an individual to make them sexual
  • Rating peers or social platform members on attractiveness or sexual activity

Exploitation, coercion, and threats

  • Pressuring someone to share sexual content of themselves or engage in sexual activity online, offline, or both
  • Threatening to sexually violate an individual
  • Threatening to publish sexual content online to intimidate, coerce, or blackmail an individual—sextortion
  • Inciting an individual to engage in sexual behavior and exploit them by publishing the content online
  • Encouraging others to commit sexual violence

Questions? Comments?

Do you have a specific question that this article didn’t answered? Send us a message and we’ll answer it for you!

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How to Get Started On Your Personal Desensitization Plan

Desensitization requires exposure to your fear, either in a progressive or a controlled manner. Your specific plan depends on the type of fear and the degree that it affects you. Since your fear can be real or imaginary, the best way to understand how to get started involves first figuring out what type of trigger you have. Let’s look at two examples:

  • Dizziness Those that experience anxiety attacks may experience dizziness. That dizziness can trigger further anxiety, which in turn can make panic attacks worse. Even though the person may already have anxiety, the trigger for further anxiety is a real sensation – dizziness – that the person has to target.
  • Snakes For a phobia like snakes, you may think the fear is real – after all, snakes are real – but the fear is actually imaginary. Chances are you don’t encounter snakes every day, and most snakes aren’t dangerous, but if you fear snakes to the point where it affects your life (and if the idea of snakes causes fear, even if a snake isn’t there) then the fear is imaginary.

Try to figure out what your triggers are. If the idea of them causes fear, chances are it is an imaginary fear. If you actually experience the issue first hand, then the fear may be real. In some ways, it could be a combination of both. Figuring this out is the first step.

There are four steps towards desensitizing yourself to your triggers and fears. They include:

Preparation

The first step is preparation. This involves both mental preparation and crafting a plan. First, you need to make sure you’re ready for this and you need to make sure you can commit to it. It’s actually possible to increase your fear if you expose yourself to the trigger and don’t follow through with your desensitization plan.

You also need to make sure you know in advance what you’re going to do and how you’re going to do it. You don’t want to let your fear stop you from doing everything you need to do desensitize yourself, which means you also need to have a plan/project in place based on your research into desensitization that will help you prepare for the road ahead.

Initial Exposure

Once you’re ready, it’s time to get started. There are two different techniques used for desensitization therapy, which we will describe below, but before you begin make sure you’ve written down on paper your view of how much the triggers bother you.

Most people have more than one trigger, and you’ll want to solve one before you move on to another. Use a 1 to 10 scale, where 10 is “severe anxiety” and 1 is “no anxiety.” Write down each and every trigger, and then put them in a hierarchy so that you can combat them one at a time, starting with your worst trigger. Always start with your worst, because your worst fear often contributes to other fears. Then do one of the following:

  • Progressive For imaginary triggers, start with a progressive desensitization plan. This is best for phobias. If you’re afraid of spiders, for example, then sit and think about a scary spider or look at a paper with a photo of a spider. Keep looking at it, and while you do, try to calm yourself down. Don’t look away – just imagine and/or look at a picture of a spider and get yourself used to the experience, so that eventually the picture of a spider doesn’t scare you.
  • Controlled When you have a real trigger, use a controlled desensitization plan. Let’s use the dizziness example again. Here, you’ll spin yourself around in a chair until you feel dizzy. It may cause you some anxiety, and that’s okay, but you need to experience being very dizzy. The goal of this strategy is to continue experiencing it until you get used to it and your mind and body don’t experience as much fear when you feel dizziness.

Remember, only do one trigger at a time. Your end goal is to make sure that the trigger only causes a 1 or 2 on the anxiety scale before you move on to the next one.

Repeat Exposure

Every day (or whenever possible), continue exposing yourself to the fear. If you’re using the progressive desensitization technique, wait until each individual cause of fear stops causing as much anxiety. Let’s use the spiders as an example:

  • Start with thinking about spiders. Once thinking about spiders doesn’t affect you, move on.
  • Move on to looking at a photo. Once the photo stops affecting you, move on.
  • Move on to looking at different photos. Once they stop causing anxiety, move on.
  • Move on to looking at YouTube videos of spiders. Once they stop causing anxiety, move on.
  • Move on to looking at actual spiders. Once they stop causing anxiety, move on.
  • Move on to touching or being close to a spider. Once it stops causing anxiety, you may be done.

Progressive desensitization involves ramping up towards what causes you the most fear. It’s not always a great idea to skip right to the end, because the fear can be too pronounced. Gradual – especially for imagined fears, is much better.

For real fears, or those that benefit better from controlled desensitization, continue the same controlled technique (making yourself dizzy, in this case) until it simply stops causing you anxiety. Then move on to your next trigger. Those with panic attacks often have many different triggers based on physical sensations, so it will take a while to stop them all.

Maintenance

Anxiety and fears can come back if you don’t keep at it. So the final step is maintenance. Once you’ve completely reduced your anxieties in these areas, schedule a time one a month or so to perform all of these again just once (touching a spider, making yourself dizzy, etc.) and see if they create any anxiety. If not, then great – you’re still in the clear. If they do, write down how much anxiety they create on your scale and work with them again until it’s back to a 1 or 2.

Anamorphic Lenses: What are They and When to Use Them

June 7, 2021 Cinema Lenses, Photography, Videography • One Comment

Historically, anamorphic lenses have been used almost entirely by cinema filmmakers. But is there room in your kit for an anamorphic lens?

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